PortailForumCalendrierFAQRechercherS'enregistrerMembresGroupesConnexionAccueilTwitter-FCS
Partagez | 
 

 La production du moteur NK33 devrait reprendre en 2014

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
patchfree




Masculin Nombre de messages : 6130
Age : 61
Localisation : Poitiers
Date d'inscription : 19/04/2007

MessageSujet: La production du moteur NK33 devrait reprendre en 2014   Ven 3 Juil 2009 - 15:39

Célèbre moteur développé par Nikolaï Kouznetsov pour la fusée lunaire soviétique N1, ce moteur doit équiper deux futures fusées: la Taurus-2 américaine et le Soyouz-1, version légère de la soyouz (une soyouz sans les boosters).

Selon Kirilin le directeur du TsKB Progress la production devrait reprendre en 2014. D'ici là le TsSKB Progress va établir la documentation afin que la production reprenne dans les locaux de "Motorstroïtel".

Selon Kiriline il est plus économique de relancer la production plutôt que de développer un nouveau moteur, d'autant que celui-ci a montré une très grande fiabilité et que sa conception fait que certaines de ses caractéristiques le rend encore unique au monde...

On sait qu'un grand nombre de ces moteurs sont déjà assemblés et conservés. Une partie de ces moteurs ont été achetés par les concepteur de la Taurus et les autres devraient servir à la Soyouz-1. Cette réserve devrait ainsi laisser le temps à la production de reprendre.

Bien sûr tout cela dépend du contexte économique et en particulier en ce moment. Mais qui peut dire ce qui se passera en 2014...

[Samara News]


Dernière édition par patchfree le Mer 16 Sep 2009 - 0:01, édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
patchfree




Masculin Nombre de messages : 6130
Age : 61
Localisation : Poitiers
Date d'inscription : 19/04/2007

MessageSujet: Re: La production du moteur NK33 devrait reprendre en 2014   Mer 16 Sep 2009 - 0:00

Les évolutions des projets américains pourraient favoriser ce projet de reprendre la production du moteur NK-33...

A lire:

Aerojet Looking to Restart Production of NK-33 Engine
By Amy Klamper

WASHINGTON — Aerojet is in talks with Russian propulsion firms to restart production of the Soviet-era NK-33 rocket engine that the Sacramento, Calif.-based propulsion company is modernizing for use on Orbital Sciences’ Taurus 2 medium-lift rocket.

Aerojet’s vice president of space systems, Julie Van Kleeck, said Aug. 27 that the two companies are weighing the benefits of restarting production of the 1960s engine in Russia, initiating a new line in the United States, or possibly doing both.

“We’re in discussions trying to understand one another’s demand and what the trigger points are and how production might be started in one place or the other,” Van Kleeck told Space News. “It’s a very active situation right now in terms of discussion.”

Orbital Sciences is building the Taurus 2 rocket to launch an unmanned cargo tug called Cygnus that the Dulles, Va.-based company has been working on since early 2008, when it beat a dozen competitors to win a NASA Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) demonstration contract worth $171 million. In December, Orbital won a Commercial Resupply Services (CRS) contract valued at $1.9 billion to deliver to the international space station a minimum of 20 metric tons of pressurized cargo spread over eight flights between 2010 and 2016. Space Exploration Technologies of Hawthorne, Calif., which has been working on a rival system with NASA’s help since 2006, has a 12-flight cargo-resupply contract worth $1.6 billion.

Slated to make its launch debut in 2010 from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility on Virginia’s eastern shore, the Taurus 2 will be powered by two modified NK-33 engines. The liquid oxygen and kerosene engines originally designed for Russia’s abandoned Moon program were acquired by Aerojet in the 1990s and more recently redesignated AJ26-62 for use on Taurus 2.

Today, Aerojet has 37 NK-33 engines in the United States, and owns the rights to additional surplus inventory in Russia. Van Kleeck says at this time there are ample NK-33s in the United States and Russia to support Orbital’s planned CRS contract commitment.

“From a U.S. perspective, there are enough engines for CRS to go 10 to 12 years,” she said, adding that a more optimistic view of forecasted U.S. demand would call for starting a new production line within the next three to five years.

The Russians, on the other hand, are looking at more near-term scenarios, she said. Space News was unable to obtain comment from Russian officials by press time, but U.S. industry sources said Russia is interested in restarting NK-33 production to power its Soyuz rockets.

Nikolai Yakushin, the deputy general director of Moscow-based United Engine Corp., wrote Orbital Sciences Chief Executive Officer David W. Thompson in late June to give assurance that Russia will be able to meet Orbital’s demand for the NK-33 engine from existing inventory and a restart of NK-33 production in Russia, according to a U.S. industry source familiar with the letter.

Information posted on Russia’s Samara Space Center Web site says Russia has developed a draft design for a Soyuz 2-3 launch vehicle to include a “gimbaled sustainer engine NK-33-1 with upgraded power capability” for use on the central stage of the rocket.

Van Kleeck said most of Aerojet’s NK-33 modifications are specific to Taurus 2, though Russia may be interested in some modern technologies the company has developed. One U.S. industry source said Russia is eyeing a new gimbal and a number of modern actuators that Aerojet designed for its Americanized NK-33 variants.

“There are a couple of things they are interested in, but we haven’t taken those discussions very far. The specific vehicle mods would not be of interest … it’s more the new hardware that we might be putting in,” Van Kleeck said, adding that any modifications to the original engine would be subject to U.S. licensing requirements for export to Russia.

At this point, Van Kleeck said talks are concentrated on where the new line would be built, though she said Aerojet would prefer a U.S. production line if a sound business case can be made. “The negatives [to restarting a Russian production line] are that you are dealing with purchasing something from another country, and there are just a lot of steps to bringing something like that into this country,” she said, adding that U.S. production would give Aerojet an opportunity to immediately respond to problems that could potentially crop up during manufacturing.

Although the two sides are considering the start of two separate production lines — one U.S., one Russian — Van Kleeck said she is not convinced there is demand for both lines. “There’s a significant investment to put a line like this in place,” she said, adding that regardless, Aerojet is fully prepared to enter production, and has been since the 1990s when the now-defunct Kistler Aerospace designed its K-1 reusable rocket around Aerojet’s modified NK-33.

“We have all the drawings to produce the engines, and have had them translated and are prepared to go into production,” she said. “We need to make sure we have the supply base for various components [we are] buying, and we have some process work to do to replicate things in this country, but we truly don’t see significant risks to do this. It’s not a trivial process to go into production, but we’re fully prepared to do that if it makes economic sense.”

That said, engines produced in Russia likely would cost less than engines produced domestically, she said. In addition, because the NK-33 originates in Russia, it is likely that restarting a production line there could be done more quickly than starting from scratch in the United States, a scenario that could take four or five years.

“We believe there would be a price benefit of being able to purchase the engines from Russia. That might not be true in five years, but that’s the case today,” Van Kleeck said. “Given that uncertainty, we are evaluating both scenarios for U.S. customers, and believe the Russians are doing the same to evaluate their needs.”

At this point, the only clear demand for the NK-33 from Aerojet’s perspective is Orbital and its CRS commitment, which one U.S. industry source said entails two Taurus 2 launches per year. But if the launch rate were to increase, Van Kleeck said there could be a need for new production down the road.

“From a U.S. perspective, in an optimistic sense, you could make the argument that someone needs to start setting up the line three years from now,” she said. “We’re evaluating nominal as well as optimistic cases.”

This fall, Aerojet is planning a long-duration, high-power test firing of the NK-33 in Samara, Russia. Scheduled for late September or early October, the test could raise confidence in the engine. “A successful demonstration will increase the confidence level and allow us to reduce some of the performance margins we’ll be carrying,” Antonio Elias, vice president and general manager of Orbital’s advanced programs group, said Aug. 28. “By performing this ground test, we’ll be able to fly with smaller reserves.”

Van Kleeck said the upcoming test, which Aerojet has been contemplating for more than a year, is not related to discussions about restarting production.

“If, however, these tests result in other future applications, they could become related. If the test is wildly successful, it could lead to future customers and it could drive the need for production sooner,” she said.

http://www.spacenews.com/launch/aerojet-looking-restart-production-nk-33-engine.html
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
patchfree




Masculin Nombre de messages : 6130
Age : 61
Localisation : Poitiers
Date d'inscription : 19/04/2007

MessageSujet: Re: La production du moteur NK33 devrait reprendre en 2014   Mar 6 Oct 2009 - 12:49

Nouveau test du NK-33 à Samara: 220 s et un nouveau test dans quelques jours. Tout cela pour utiliser le moteur "lunaire" sur la Taurus2 et la soyouz1...

NK-33 fires again

On Oct. 1, 2009, the NK-33 engine fired for 220 seconds at a test stand in Samara, demonstrating maximum capabilities of the engine. The test aimed to demonstrate a possibility of using the engine in the US-built Taurus-2 rocket, whose maiden launch was expected in 2010.
Representatives of the US firm Aerojet, responsible for integration of NK-33 into Taurus-2, were present at the test. Alongside the American delegation, representatives of Samara-based TsSKB Progress also watched the firing. Yet, another test of the same engine was planned within a week, after a replacement of expendable elements. Thus it would demonstrate the capability of the engine to conduct multiple firings. The future test was to benefit both, Taurus-2 and Soyuz-1 projects.


http://www.russianspaceweb.com/soyuz1_lv.html#nk33
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
montmein69




Masculin Nombre de messages : 13628
Age : 65
Localisation : région lyonnaise
Date d'inscription : 01/10/2005

MessageSujet: Re: La production du moteur NK33 devrait reprendre en 2014   Mar 6 Oct 2009 - 18:04

Je me posais la question de la conservation de la "réserve" de moteurs datant de la N1.
Il doit falloir un sacré travail de "remise en état" pour que ces moteurs certes neufs mais quand même vieux puissent être utilisés ?
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
patchfree




Masculin Nombre de messages : 6130
Age : 61
Localisation : Poitiers
Date d'inscription : 19/04/2007

MessageSujet: Re: La production du moteur NK33 devrait reprendre en 2014   Mar 6 Oct 2009 - 18:43

montmein69 a écrit:
Je me posais la question de la conservation de la "réserve" de moteurs datant de la N1.
Il doit falloir un sacré travail de "remise en état" pour que ces moteurs certes neufs mais quand même vieux puissent être utilisés ?

Ils semble que non puisque déjà 30 ou 40 avaient été vendus aux américains il y a quelques années et qu'ils les font marcher sur banc comme ils veulent... Je crois donc qu'ils ont été sauvés de la destruction et stockés dans de bonnes conditions par leur concepteur Nikolaï Kouznetsov. Pour que les russes les jugent dignes d'être utilisés sur soyouz il faut croire qu'ils sont d'une remarquable conception et bien conservés. Le TsSKB Progress a étudié cette question en détail et jugé que c'était la meilleure solution: une réserve suffisante pour en démarrer l'exploitation rapidement et relancer la production si nécessaire sans que cela retarde le programme, et le tout d'une façon avantageuse par rapport à tout redévelopper.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
montmein69




Masculin Nombre de messages : 13628
Age : 65
Localisation : région lyonnaise
Date d'inscription : 01/10/2005

MessageSujet: Re: La production du moteur NK33 devrait reprendre en 2014   Mer 7 Oct 2009 - 7:42

patchfree a écrit:
Le TsSKB Progress a étudié cette question en détail et jugé que c'était la meilleure solution: une réserve suffisante pour en démarrer l'exploitation rapidement et relancer la production si nécessaire sans que cela retarde le programme, et le tout d'une façon avantageuse par rapport à tout redévelopper.

Effectivement si le stock a été parfaitement conservé cela est payant. Pourquoi ré-inventer si le modèle est toujours performant.

Pourquoi cette stratégie parait-elle simple, économique et rationnelle, comparée aux multiples volte-faces du choix des motorisations pour l'Ares 5 américaine ?
Il est vrai que l'engin est gigantesque, et qu"avec des spécifications qui ne se "stabilisent pas" ... difficile de trouver une motorisation adaptée même s'il y a pas mal de "solutions dans le placard"
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
montmein69




Masculin Nombre de messages : 13628
Age : 65
Localisation : région lyonnaise
Date d'inscription : 01/10/2005

MessageSujet: Re: La production du moteur NK33 devrait reprendre en 2014   Mer 7 Oct 2009 - 7:49

Pour se rafraichir la mémoire ... cet extrait du site d'un excellentissime historien du spatial veneration dans la partie "héritage de la N1" :
http://www.capcomespace.net/dossiers/espace_sovietique/programme_lunaire/N1_heritage.htm

Citation :

Les moteurs à kérosène et oxygène liquide NK 33 et 43 sont les plus performant jamais construit. Versions améliorés des NK 15 et 15b qui ont volé sur la première N1, ils ont été construit par Kuznetsov Joint Stock Company. 30 NK 33 équipent le premier étage de la N1 lors des trois autres tirs de 1970-72. Après annulation du programme N1 en 1974, l'ordre est donné de détruite le matériel de la N1. mais les ingénieurs qui ont travaillé sur ces moteurs décident de cacher une centaine de moteur dans un hangar près de Samara à 100 km de Moscou pour une future utilisation. Après la chute du mur de Berlin et la dissolution de l'URSS, les russes prennent contact avec les américain et propose ce moteur à flux intégré. La technologie du flux intégré permet de gagner 20% de puissance en plus par rapport aux flux dérivée des moteurs RL 10 et SSME qui équipent les étages Centaur et le Shuttle.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
patchfree




Masculin Nombre de messages : 6130
Age : 61
Localisation : Poitiers
Date d'inscription : 19/04/2007

MessageSujet: Re: La production du moteur NK33 devrait reprendre en 2014   Mer 7 Oct 2009 - 19:43

[quote="montmein69"]
patchfree a écrit:
Pourquoi ré-inventer si le modèle est toujours performant.


Il faut être honnête: dans le domaine des moteurs de fusée les progrès techniques sont minimes depuis 50 ans. Des procédés de fabrication de sont améliorés mais l'essentiel des découvertes scientifiques à la base datent de près d'un siècle. Le reste c'est de l'ingénierie. Donc un moteur bien conçu (et brûlant des ergols pas trop polluants) a toute les chances d'avoir une longue vie d'exploitation. C'est assez paradoxal mais le domaine spatial qui parait à la pointe des technologies utilise des découvertes assez anciennes.

Ceci dit si le NK33 est réutilisé ce sera une belle histoire. bravo
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
patchfree




Masculin Nombre de messages : 6130
Age : 61
Localisation : Poitiers
Date d'inscription : 19/04/2007

MessageSujet: Re: La production du moteur NK33 devrait reprendre en 2014   Ven 30 Avr 2010 - 23:08

Des nouvelles du NK-33: un accord entre Aerojet et OAO United Engine Corporation qui porte sur la commercialisation de la version modernisée du NK33 et du AJ26/NK33 et l'éventuelle reprise de production. Ce moteur va équiper la Taurus II créée par orbital Science.

AMERICAN COMPANY AEROJET and OAO United Engine Corporation" signed an agreement on cooperation within the association for rocket motors for space launch MARKET
28.04.2010


The American company Aerojet and OAO "UK" United Engine Corporation (JDC) signed a cooperation agreement to promote the rocket engines NK-33 and AJ26/NK-33 the commercial launches.

The combined efforts of Aerojet and JDC will include marketing, sales, technical support and testing of engines NK-33 and AJ26/NK-33. The parties will also explore the possibility of restoring the production of engine NK-33 in Russia. This agreement is the result of more than 15 years of cooperation between Aerojet and OAO SNTK them. ND Kuznetsov, "which is part of the JDC, to ensure the cruise system growing world market for commercial space launches.

Under the agreement, RBC will implement marketing and sales of modernized NC-33 in the Russian Federation, as well as testing and supply of additional Aerojet rocket engines NK-33 for their modification in AJ26 and eventual restoration of the production of engine NK-33 and its modifications. JDC will also provide support for the modernized NC-33 for rockets launched into Russia.

Aerojet, having an exclusive license to NC-33 and AJ26/NK-33 in the U.S., will be responsible for marketing and sales of engines, modification of NK-33 in AJ26 and support of these engines to rockets launched in the U.S.. Aerojet will continue to evaluate opportunities AJ26 engine production in the U.S., based on the needs of the market.

Currently, Aerojet provides rocket motors AJ26/NK-33 first stage booster rocket Taurus-2 »(Taurus II), created by the Research Corporation Orbital (USA), RBC provides a engines NK-33 customers in Russia. As Aerojet, and JDC, respectively provide AJ26 engines and modernized NK-33 to interested customers in the U.S. and Russia.

Recently, Aerojet and JDC on a test basis SNTK them. Kuznetsov Samara completed a series of tests of NK-33 in the development of launch vehicle "Taurus-2" created by Orbital. These tests are based on extensive database mining engine, which includes more than 17 years of testing and covering about 1500 fire engine test a total of 194000 seconds. Fire tests on additional time confirmed that the alleged characteristics AJ26/NK-33 to the limits and duration meet the requirements of today's commercial launch vehicles.

* * *

On rocket engines NK-33 and AJ26/NK-33

AJ26 - is revised at the request of American customers NK-33 engine, originally created in the USSR for the rocket, which was supposed to deliver astronauts to the moon.

The world's first oxygen-kerosene engine such dimension, performed on a closed circuit with afterburning oxidizing gas, NK-33 has reached a high efficiency with low weight and compact dimensions. Modification and modernization AJ26/NK-33, produced by Aerojet, did NC-33 applicable to current and prospective commercial launch vehicles. Aerojet SNTK them. Kuznetsova since the mid 90-ies have cooperated in promoting AJ26/NK-33 the U.S. commercial space market.

* * *

Aerojet »(Aerojet) (USA) - one of the world's leading space industry and defense industry, specializing in the production of missile systems, motors for launch vehicles, weapons. Is part of GenCorp - high-tech multi-disciplinary group specializing in the manufacture of products for space and defense, as well as in real estate.

http://www.Aerojet.com

http://www.GenCorp.com

JSC "Management company" United Engine Corporation - 100 -% subsidiary of OAO OPK Oboronprom management engine building assets. It is Russia's leading association in the development and production of engines for aircraft, rockets, electricity and gas pumping

OAO Oboronprom "- a diversified engineering group, established in 2002. Is part of GC "Russian Technologies". Main activities: helicopter (JSC "Helicopters of Russia"), engine (CC "Joint Engine Corporation"), other assets.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
 
La production du moteur NK33 devrait reprendre en 2014
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
Le forum de la conquête spatiale :: Actualité spatiale :: Russie-
Créer un forum | © phpBB | Forum gratuit d'entraide | Contact | Signaler un abus | Forum gratuit